Segawa & Job

Adorable & Keziah

Lillian

Eva & Grace

UGANDA

Heart for People supports five schools across the southern regions of Uganda. Some of our students come from single parent households, some have no parents at all, and some are raised by another relative. Most simply cannot afford the shoes, books, uniform, pencils and lunch required to attend a “free” government school. Learn more about each of our partner schools and the amazing directors who run them.

Want to know more about poverty in Uganda? Try these sites:

UNICEF

Rural Poverty Portal

World Bank 

The World Factbook

State of the World’s Children Report 2014

The government of Uganda has made considerable progress in implementing universal primary education by building and staffing hundreds of primary schools around the country that do not charge tuition. But to attend these “free” government-funded public schools, each child must come to class with shoes, books, pencils, a uniform, and a lunch. The poorest and most rural children cannot afford even these basic necessities.

press to zoom

Lunch at most schools is porridge, a very cheap and non-nutritious meal consisting of flour and water. Most schools charge about 500 Ugandan shillings (the equivalent of about 20 cents in the U.S.) each day for a cup of porridge, but some families cannot afford even that.

press to zoom

The government requires guardians to purchase uniforms for the students so that families are more invested in their children’s education. But this policy prevents children such as these from attending school. These children have one outfit. Some do not even possess a single shirt. The non-profit schools supported by Heart for People are their only hope for an education, a future, and a life out of poverty.

press to zoom

The government of Uganda has made considerable progress in implementing universal primary education by building and staffing hundreds of primary schools around the country that do not charge tuition. But to attend these “free” government-funded public schools, each child must come to class with shoes, books, pencils, a uniform, and a lunch. The poorest and most rural children cannot afford even these basic necessities.

press to zoom
1/4

About Uganda

Uganda struggles to combat a host of problems endemic to the region.

Almost 40% of the country is living below the international poverty line ($1.25 per day).

Nearly half of the population is under the age of 15.

Less than 25% of the children who enroll in primary school finish their last year.

Only 17% attend secondary school.